Scientifically Proven

People who consume foods that have a low glycemic index have a significant better chance of managing their weight long term.

Scientifically Proven At The World's Top Research Centers

Low GI Studies

Numerous studies completed at many of the world’s top universities and research centers show people who consume foods that have a low glycemic index have significant better chance of managing their weight long term. Of course, there are many other diets on the market that help people lose weight in the short term, but the problem is they’re often unsustainable. In fact, 97% people who follow ‘nutrient eliminating’ diets regain all the weight they lost (and more) within three years. Research studies show that people who eat low glycemic foods feel fuller and more satisfied for longer periods. Since they don’t experience frequent food cravings and can reduce their calorie intake, they’re more successful at long-term weight management.

Low GI Studies

Studies show eating low GI meals increases satiety and decreases hunger.
Summary:
This review paper summarizes and discusses findings from 16 studies assessing the effect of low GI meals on appetite. The majority of these studies showed consuming low GI meals compared to high GI meals, increased satiety and decreased hunger or decreased ad libitum (eating as much  or as often desired).
Reference: Ludwig, D.S. (2000), Dietary Glycemic Index and Obesity, J. Nutr 2000; 130 (2S Suppl): 280S-283S.
Study type: Review

 

Diets with modest decreases in GI and modest increases in protein show improved maintenance of weight loss.
Summary:
This study enrolled overweight adults from eight European countries who had lost at least 8% of their initial body weight with a low-calorie diet. To help prevent weight regain over a 26-week period, participants were randomly assigned to one of five ad libitum diets: a low-protein and low glycemic index diet, a low-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and low glycemic-index diet, a high-protein and high-glycemic-index diet, or a control diet. A modest increase in protein content and a modest reduction in the glycemic index led to an improvement in study completion and maintenance of weight loss.
Reference: Larsen TM, Dalskov SM, van Baak M, Jebb SA, Papadaki A, Pfeiffer AF, Martinez JA, Handjieva-Darlenska T, Kunešová M, Pihlsgård M, Stender S, Holst C, Saris WH, Astrup A; Diet, Obesity, and Genes (Diogenes) Project. Diets with high or low protein content and glycemic index for weight-loss maintenance. N Engl J Med. 2010; 363(22):2102-13.
Study type: Multicenter randomized controlled trial

 

Low GI diets out perform other weight reduction diets and help reduce cardiovascular risk.
Summary: This study identified randomized controlled trials and assessed the effect of low glycemic index diets on body weight and other health outcomes, including several cardiovascular risk factors in overweight or obese people. Six randomized controlled trials were identified. Pooling the results of these studies using statistical analyses showed that overweight and obese people lost more weight on low glycemic index diets and had more improvement in blood lipid profiles when compared to those on control diets.
Reference: Thomas DE, Elliott EJ, Baur L. Low glycemic index or low glycemic load diets for overweight and obesity.
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2007; (3): CD005105.
Study type: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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Low GI diets lead to modest weight loss.
Summary:This study identified randomized control trials and assessed the effect of low glycemic index diets on body weight in people with and without diabetes. Thirty-one randomized controlled trials were identified. Pooling the results of these studies using statistical analyses showed that low glycemic index diets lead to modest weight loss compared to control diets in people with and without diabetes.
Reference: Braunstein CR, Blanco Mejia S, Stoiko E, Noronha JC, Choo V, Ha V, Augustin LS, Kendall CWC, Jenkins DJA, Sievenpiper JL. Effect of Low-Glycemic Index/Load Diets on Body Weight: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Can J Diabetes 2016; 40 (5): S14 – S14.
Study type: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Low GI diets ideal for weight maintenance over the long term.
Summary: This study identified all longer term (>6 months) randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of low glycemic index diets on body weight and other risk factors for obesity in overweight or obese participants (BMI >25 kg/m2).  Fourteen randomized controlled trials were identified for body weight and eight for waist circumference. Pooling the results of these studies using statistical analyses showed low glycemic index diets did not significantly alter body weight and waist circumference in overweight or obese participants.
Reference: Schwingshackl L, Hoffmann G. Long-term effects of low glycemic index/load vs. high glycemic index/load diets on parameters of obesity and obesity-associated risks: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013; 23(8):699-706.
Study type: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

*This content is under review by our SoLo Registered Dieticians and Scientific Advisors. Please review any meal plans and recipes with your own personal nutritionist and do not make dietary decisions wholly based on the content of the SoLo Nutrition website.

Effie_Viguiliouk_Photo

Effie Viguiliouk, MSc at
University of Toronto, ON

Glycemic Index Clinical Research Advisor

Effie completed her HBSc at the University of Toronto, majoring in Nutritional Sciences and Human Biology. She then went on to complete her MSc in the Department of Nutritional Sciences within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto under the supervision of Dr. John Sievenpiper and Dr. David Jenkins. Her thesis dissertation assessed the effect of replacing animal protein sources with plant protein sources on risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Over the past seven years, she has published several peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters pertaining to the impact of low glycemic index foods and dietary patterns on chronic disease risk, including its impact on obesity and body weight. Her work pertaining to the glycemic index has also focused on addressing criticisms of the glycemic index. Currently, she works as a Research Coordinator at SickKids and is a Research Fellow at the Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis.

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